Lesson 6: Creating movement, negative space, and is it okay to stage your space?

lesson 6 surf

A. Create movement,

this can be done in a few ways, If you are shooting people, get them comfortable by having them move around a bit, and shoot them in action. Another way to show movement is through framing, let’s say you want to take a picture of a kid running, and you want to add to the drama of their movement. Shoot with more space behind them than in front to convey that they have already covered ground and are about to run out of the frame. Alternately you can shoot with your subject entering the frame with a lot of ground to cover to convey movement.

 

Photo: Elaina Francis

Photo: Elaina Francis


B. Sometimes less is more,

especially on Instagram. Negative space is the subtle area around the subject. If I am taking a photo of a girl on a cliff overlooking the ocean I will get far away and take a big open shot with her in the bottom line of the Rule of Thirds Grid mentioned in lesson 5. The top ⅔ of the photo is all negative space. Viewers love this, because it’s less information for the brain to process. frequent use of Negative Space combined with a consistent editing style is guaranteed to gain followers on the Gram! (that’s hip slang for Instagram)

 

Photo: Elaina Francis

Photo: Elaina Francis


C. Getting a photo to look natural and not staged

can at times prove to be very difficult and annoying. For those who are promoting something, like a product or service, staging can be key! A helpful tip to creating realism is to use the rule of thirds to draw the viewer to the product without having to put it smack in the center of the frame.

 

ASSIGNMENT: Take a picture with a lot of negative space, try to use the rule of thirds to lead the viewer to your subject. (negative space can be created with a large outdoor area or just with a wall behind what you’re shooting) Email your photo to topher@prizmcollective.com with “Postworthy: Lesson 6” in the subject line.